The Use of a Heart Monitor While Training

The most important thing when it comes to training, cardio safely (running, cycling, elliptical) is to know your training zones according to heart rate (beats per minute). Maximum heart rate (MHR) is individual and unique for each person, and the most correct formula to know it is through a stress test. In the event that we cannot perform it, we can guide ourselves through the following formula, which gives us an approximate value with which we can guide ourselves in our training. For example, this means that if you are a 30-year-old woman, your maximum heart rate will be 196 beats per minute. A number that is greater than that should never appear on your heart rate monitor since you would be outside your safety zone, and it could be dangerous for your health.

The Training Zones

There are different training zones at Denver Fitness Center, depending on the heart rate, always talking about percentages of it:

Zone 1: Less than 60% of your FCM is the area in which you would warm up and recover prior to exercise, and it is ideal for elderly or overweight people who want to improve their health. You roughly find yourselves in it while walking lightly.

Zone 2: Between 60% and 70% of your FCM is an area in which you are comfortable, such as when you jog slowly. It improves the physical form of the person in a general way.

Zone 3: Between 70% and 80% of your FCM is the ideal zone to stay if you plan to do extensive training (long, approximately 45 minutes) and your goal is to burn fat. They are approximately the pulsations that you maintain when you jog lightly.

Zone 4: Between 80% and 90% of your FCM is the submaximal intensity zone and the body begins to use glycogen for fuel. You will be in this zone when you do the fast series.

Zone 5: More than 90% of your FCM is an area that you must only reach if you are well-trained and at specific times and of short duration. It helps you, for example, to control short sprints, in which you have to reach a very high-intensity peak.

Conclusion

Many heart rate monitors today inform you in which area you are working, which would make your workout much easier. If not, a simple equation will suffice to know if you are within the correct zone.